This page is for personal, non-commercial use. You may order presentation ready copies to distribute to your colleagues, customers, or clients, by visiting http://www.autobloglicensing.com Diesel engines are extremely efficient  and produce loads of useful torque, but they also produce much high levels of NOx emissions and soot and other particulates that are harmful to the environment and people, which has dimmed their prospects, particularly in the wake of the recent diesel emissions cheating scandal. But the folks at Sandia National Laboratories Combustion Research Facility may have a way to drastically reduce the diesel engine’s pollutants, which could make diesel a more viable interim propulsion system again. The breakthrough lies in fuel-injector design. Sandia calls it ducted fuel injection, and compares the design to a Bunsen burner like you may have used in high school or college. How it works is that instead of the fuel injector spraying fuel straight into the open combustion chamber, there are ducts just outside the injector openings the fuel is sprayed through. The ducts are shaped such that as the fuel is sprayed into them, air is pulled in from the back of th...